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How it works

SPGs are permanently attached to the outside of boilers, furnaces, cement kilns and other suitable types of equipment. The target area is cleaned by means of controlled shock pulses of detonated gases (methane and oxygen) and is a fully automatic process. These shock pulses are dispersed over a large area around the discharge tube of the SPG which dislodges ash and fouling.

The detonation frequency of SPGs can vary from 15 minutes to every 24hrs depending on the level and nature of fouling. The detonations can occur either to a pre-arranged schedule or when performance tracking indicates a requirement. As a result SPGs can increase the periods between maintenance outages and improve the overall efficiency and cost effectiveness of a plant.

 


Standby Mode

The natural gas and oxygen dosing tanks are filled to a pre-set pressure. The nitrogen pressure presses the piston against the valve seat keeping the empty combustion chamber sealed.

Filling

Upon the start of the cycle, the filling valve opens. The dosing tanks are filled to a set pressure, and the valves close.

Transfer

The transfer valves open and the two gases flow via non-return valves and flame backstroke barriers, where they are mixed and then enter the main and pre-combustion chambers.

Ignition

The glow plug is activated, igniting the mixture in the pre-combustion chamber. The expansion of gases forces the piston away from the valve seat.

Combustion

By the time the piston has retracted, the flame from the pre-combustion chamber has travelled to the main combustion chamber igniting the main body of gas, generating a shock pulse, which is discharged through the nozzle into the boiler.

By the time the piston has retracted, the flame from the pre-combustion chamber has travelled to the main combustion chamber igniting the main body of gas, generating a shock pulse, which is discharged through the nozzle into the boiler.

End of Cycle

Once the gases have been fully discharged from the combustion chamber, the nitrogen pressure forces the piston against the valve seat, resealing the unit. The shock pulse generator is then ready for the next cycle.

Once the gases have been fully discharged from the combustion chamber, the nitrogen pressure forces the piston against the valve seat, resealing the unit. The shock pulse generator is then ready for the next cycle.

End of Cycle
Filling
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